Tutorials

FAQ

Most frequent questions and answers

We are looking for highly motivated league organizers that are mission aligned to grow the SFFFA program. We will review the amount of leagues in that area, and require every new league organizer to complete a background check as part of the approval process. START A TEAM REGISTRATION get in touch if you are interested in starting a brand new league with SFFFA.

League operators are free to schedule their season as long or short as they would like, however the typical season takes place in the Spring, Fall and sometimes Winter. Most seasons are anywhere from 7 to 10 weeks.  

We are looking for highly motivated league organizers that are mission aligned to grow the SFFFA program. We will review the amount of leagues in that area, and require every new league organizer to complete a background check as part of the approval process.

The first rule of flag football is pretty straight forward: there’s no contact allowed. That includes tackling, blocking, and screening. Instead, players wear FLAGS that hang along their sides by a belt. To “tackle” the person in possession of the ball, the opposing team needs to pull one or both of their flags off.  

This rule, along with several others, serve a single purpose: to keep players safe. From creating “no run zones” to eliminating fumbles, flag football rules are designed to create a fast-paced, engaging version of football without the physical contact. Read all about the important FLAG FOOTBALL RULES you need to know, including the different terms and positions. 

The most notable difference between flag football and tackle football is, well, tackling. In flag football, contact is not permitted. Players wear flags and defenders are tasked with removing the flags in order to “tackle” their opponent. If the ball carrier can reach the goal line with both flags intact, he or she scores. That being said, you will find some forms of flag football that allow blocking; however, NFL FLAG is strictly non-contact. Here are a few other key differences:  

  • Number of players on the field: In general, there are fewer players on the field in flag football. The most common youth flag football leagues are 5 on 5 and 7 on 7. The field is also shorter to accommodate the smaller team size.   
  • Faster pace: Without tackling, flag football games are much faster paced. Think about it: less timeouts, no kick offs, less stoppage time— kids are flying out there. And as a result, the games are shorter than tackle football as well (usually an hour or less).  
  • Rules: To eliminate contact, you’ll find many differences between tackle football and flag football rules. For example, quarterbacks aren’t allowed to run with the ball in flag football. Diving, blocking, screening and fumbles aren’t allowed—once the ball hits the ground, it’s dead. See the complete list of FLAG FOOTBALL RULES

In simple terms, flag football positions are essentially the same as tackle, but without the linemen. There are five players on the field in SFFFA football—for both offense and defense—with assigned roles. 

But, unlike tackle football, these football positions overlap much more than you may realize. For example, one player can take on many responsibilities in a given play, such as a center transitioning into a wide receiver after snapping the ball. For this reason, versatile players tend to be more successful in flag football.

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"Always put God first"
Shannon Knowles
Founder | SFFFA
South Florida Flag Football Association